Butyrate

In Stock
$67.19
Not only is Butyrate critical in repairing the lining of the gut and the health of cells within it—it also supports healthy inflammation response to protect the body from disease while improving immune function*.
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Which Butyrate is right for me? Find out now

Benefits

Microbiome Support

Improved Digestion

Maintains PH Balance

Benefits

Microbiome Support

Improved Digestion

Balance Electrolytes

Good Health Starts In The Gut

Which Butyrate is right for me?

Calcium Magnesium

Designed to meet the needs of most people today who are deficient in Mg and Ca. This is our recommendation for most people.

Sodium Potassium

Meets the needs of athletes and those who are very active, while accommodating those with sodium sensitive hyper tension, whereby potassium antagonizes and controls sodium.

Sodium

The perfect combination for those who exercise frequently, work in hot environments, or have low blood sodium levels.

Butyrate and Your Gut

Butyrate is a supplement science says we should all get behind. Key takeaways: The microbiome is a community that involves everything from digestion to thinking and immunity,...

What on Earth is Butyrate?

Key Takeaways: We cannot make enough butyrate because we eat too few resistant starches Butyrate nourishes the gut and promotes cell differentiation* Butyrate is a necessary component...

What role does Butyrate play in my body?

• Reduces Inflammation*

• Stabilizes the microbiome*

• Reduces our desire to overeat*

• Burns fat*

• Helps the body target and eliminate unhealthy cells*

• Cleans your cells*

• Stimulates the burning of abnormal fatty acids*

• Create an environment where cancer cells are not given the conditions they need to thrive*

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Top Customer Questions

Q: Why do you use butyric acid? 
A: BodyBio’s butyrates are simply butyrate, a thirteen-atom complex joined to an alkali. Butyric acid, butyrate and tributyrin are ingredients you may see in this category of supplements. Same purpose, different characteristics. We use butyric acid aka butanoic acid, a short chain fatty acid with four carbon atoms at its heart (found in butter, hence its name). As an acid, it has a low pH so we compound it with an alkali, a combination that forms a salt + water.  At this stage, we no longer have butyric acid, but butyrate, a buffered form of butyric acid.


Q: Is Butyrate enterically coated? How do I know it makes it to the gut? 
A: The capsules of sodium butyrate are vegetarian, made from plant cellulose.  The butyrate powder within is enterically coated. Because butyrate has systemic benefits, some must then be absorbed in the upper GI tract. What people look for is to get butyrate to the colon. Here, an approach has been devised to tackle the challenge of butyrate delivery—coating with a vegetable fat, commonly cited as a medium-chain triglyceride.  The rationale behind this is that a significant part of the butyrate will be released only when lipase is secreted in the duodenum.

Top Customer Questions

Q: Why do you use butyric acid? 
A: BodyBio’s butyrates are simply butyrate, a thirteen-atom complex joined to an alkali. Butyric acid, butyrate and tributyrin are ingredients you may see in this category of supplements. Same purpose, different characteristics. We use butyric acid aka butanoic acid, a short chain fatty acid with four carbon atoms at its heart (found in butter, hence its name). As an acid, it has a low pH so we compound it with an alkali, a combination that forms a salt + water.  At this stage, we no longer have butyric acid, but butyrate, a buffered form of butyric acid.


Q: Is Butyrate enterically coated? How do I know it makes it to the gut? 
A: The capsules of sodium butyrate are vegetarian, made from plant cellulose.  The butyrate powder within is enterically coated. Because butyrate has systemic benefits, some must then be absorbed in the upper GI tract. What people look for is to get butyrate to the colon. Here, an approach has been devised to tackle the challenge of butyrate delivery—coating with a vegetable fat, commonly cited as a medium-chain triglyceride.  The rationale behind this is that a significant part of the butyrate will be released only when lipase is secreted in the duodenum.